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I pored over its every detail like I would later pore over my first and last love letter. The lyrics, too, were like nothing else. Who, prior to , put a song on a pop album about a classical composer? The first half of the song is a kind of seance, not with the dead, but with the not-yet-born.

Product description

By this point in her young career Kate had already wearied of promotional tours, yet despite minimal publicity , Never for Ever debuted in the album charts at No 1. It was the first studio album by a solo female artist ever to reach that position.

Kate Bush - Under The Ivy (lyrics on screen)

The album is never painterly, like Never for Ever frequently is. Orchestration is absent. The songs are tense, headlong and overlain and sometimes filtered through accents. They lull and startle with wild dynamic swings. I listened to it on repeat as I worked on my first two novels. The Dreaming became a kind of sonic amulet; an order to take the road less travelled. Ripples of la petite mort?

A soul looking down on its death bed?


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  • Under The Ivy: The Life And Music Of Kate Bush – Book Review.

An unwillingly unreliable narrator who only knows for sure that the love and tears of his soon-to-be bereaved are all in vain, and all too late It landed in the Live Aid summer like fresh air at the end of a long-haul flight. Her voice had ripened. The lyrics were still cliche-free, still uniquely Kate, but less enigmatic and more user-friendly than on The Dreaming. It is a thumping, stormy, sacred-and-profane, frankly orgasmic tryst of a song. Which, in an important sense, made it my first taste of feminism in popular art. Musically, this ballad for piano and vocal is one of her sparsest.

Speedboats fly above and planes — perhaps a black Spitfire or two — come crashing down. A mere six years later, 50 Words for Snow was released. Lyrically, it is themed around winter. Are they conditional immortals? Are they serial reincarnatees? I was writing a novel populated by both categories when 50 Words for Snow was released, and this song made my book feel less fantastical and more possible.

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The title track is a blizzard of 50 haiku-dense Joyce-esque words for snow minted by Kate except for those in Klingon , spoken by Stephen Fry on the recording. Fans want more of what we loved the first time, yet we complain if things feel repetitive. Kate is a mighty exception to all this, as rare as a yeti. Her fidelity to her ever-curious, ever-morphing muse has won her a body of fans who hold her songs as treasured possessions to be carried through life.

He bought the vinyl LP of Never for Ever in late I pored over its every detail like I would later pore over my first and last love letter. The lyrics, too, were like nothing else. Who, prior to , put a song on a pop album about a classical composer?

Product Information

The first half of the song is a kind of seance, not with the dead, but with the not-yet-born. By this point in her young career Kate had already wearied of promotional tours, yet despite minimal publicity , Never for Ever debuted in the album charts at No 1. It was the first studio album by a solo female artist ever to reach that position. The album is never painterly, like Never for Ever frequently is.

Orchestration is absent.

It's me, Kate Bush, I've come home: the woman behind the myth

The songs are tense, headlong and overlain and sometimes filtered through accents. They lull and startle with wild dynamic swings. I listened to it on repeat as I worked on my first two novels. The Dreaming became a kind of sonic amulet; an order to take the road less travelled. Ripples of la petite mort? A soul looking down on its death bed? An unwillingly unreliable narrator who only knows for sure that the love and tears of his soon-to-be bereaved are all in vain, and all too late It landed in the Live Aid summer like fresh air at the end of a long-haul flight.

Psychobabble: Review: 'Under the Ivy: The Life & Music of Kate Bush [New Edition]'

Her voice had ripened. The lyrics were still cliche-free, still uniquely Kate, but less enigmatic and more user-friendly than on The Dreaming. It is a thumping, stormy, sacred-and-profane, frankly orgasmic tryst of a song.

Which, in an important sense, made it my first taste of feminism in popular art. Musically, this ballad for piano and vocal is one of her sparsest. Speedboats fly above and planes — perhaps a black Spitfire or two — come crashing down.

A mere six years later, 50 Words for Snow was released. Lyrically, it is themed around winter.


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  7. Are they conditional immortals? Are they serial reincarnatees? I was writing a novel populated by both categories when 50 Words for Snow was released, and this song made my book feel less fantastical and more possible. The title track is a blizzard of 50 haiku-dense Joyce-esque words for snow minted by Kate except for those in Klingon , spoken by Stephen Fry on the recording. Fans want more of what we loved the first time, yet we complain if things feel repetitive. Kate is a mighty exception to all this, as rare as a yeti.